How to monitor your SQL Server instances and databases

Monitoring SQL Server instances and databases provides information necessary to diagnose and troubleshoot SQL Server performance issues, as well as to fine tune SQL Server. Optimal performance is not easy to define and set, as there is usually a trade-off between multiple software and hardware factors. It also depends on your environment, business requirements, and company policy.

May 26, 2014

How to synchronize large SQL Server databases

When synchronizing large databases that contain millions of records, you will come across several challenges The first challenge is to just compare such databases. When the database tables contain millions of records, their comparison through the ApexSQL Data Diff graphical interface will be very slow and in such cases, it is strongly recommend using the ApexSQL Data Diff command line interface. As there’s no need to show millions of records visually in the tool’s grid, such large databases are processed faster.

April 29, 2013

Improve the performance of an ETL process

Due to the sheer volume of data usually involved in an Extract – Transform – Load (ETL) process, performance is positioned very high on the list of requirements which need to be met in order for the process to go as smoothly as possible. Here are some guidelines which will help you speed up your high volume ETL processes

April 23, 2013

Use SQL database backups to reduce the performance impact of heavy reporting

Depending on your particular environment, database reporting can have a heavy impact on the database performance, can execute queries which run for dozens of minutes or both. This is usually the case with reports which require complex queries having multiple calls to SQL Server’s aggregate functions to be executed against very large data sets. The effect on the database performance is particularly severe in scenarios where the production database stores data which is changed often – as data modification operations require exclusive locks, in order to preserve the integrity of the database, SQL Server will go ahead with the data modification operation until the query initiated by the report is still running. This increases the chances of a deadlock occurring; especially in cases where another set of data modification instructions, dependent on the ones which are waiting for the reporting to finish has already been applied. Therefore, reporting can cause performance degradation in a production environment. So, how can reporting be optimized to prevent such a heavy load on production databases?

April 4, 2013