SQL Server database continuous integration workflow POPULATE step – Populating the newly built SQL database with data

In the third part of the continuous integration aka “CI” workflow, the Populate step will be described.

After the Build step is successfully finished, where a new database is built directly from latest changes in source control, the Populate step is initiated. In this step, non static tables in the newly built database from the source control repository will be populated with test data.

May 20, 2016

How to deploy changes directly to a SQL database from a source control repository

Challenge

One of the challenges these days is how to pull the latest changes (of SQL objects) from the source control repository and deploy them into a SQL database. This process is particularly helpful in the CI workflow Build step, when developers want to build a SQL database from the committed changes in the source control repository, so they can test if their changes compromised SQL objects from the source control repository or they will be built successfully.

April 27, 2016

SQL Server database continuous integration workflow BUILD step – Building a SQL database from a source control repository

In this article, the second Build step of the CI workflow will be described. The Build step is a step in which a database is built using the latest changes in the source control repository and once the build process is finished, a feedback of success/failure is provided to developers.

April 27, 2016

Synchronize SQL database changes between local and remote repositories in distributed source control systems

Having a SQL database being version controlled locally, by storing all changes in a repository on a local machine can be quite handy. In the context of team based database development, it is necessary to establish the environment where changes can be tested locally, specific revisions reverted from the commit history, and doing such things before pushing changes to the remote repository where the rest of the team will be able to review them, and apply against a local database copy.

April 26, 2016

SQL Server database continuous integration workflow COMMIT step – Initially committing a SQL database to a source control repository

Nowadays, it’s quite common that database changes are made several times a day and that a number of developers are making changes against the same database. Due to these often changes, a certain “process” has to be followed in order to avoid any potential problems in the later stages of development (Quality Assurance (QA), Staging, User Acceptance Test (UAT)) and at the end in production. When talking about the Continuous integration (CI) for SQL databases today, it’s often referred to a process of several steps:

April 22, 2016

Revision history of an object change in a SQL database using Git

The essence of each source control system is the ability to easily review the history of committed revisions. In addition, to comparing revisions, a user needs to get a specific revision and apply it against a database. Each revision should have a unique timestamp and should carry the information about the user who did the commit. Such system ensures that it is easy to determine who committed what and when, and in some way provide a complete auditing trail of committed revisions.

April 22, 2016

Automatically script SQL Server table data and object schema directly to source control

Imagine a scenario where you want to get your database into source control quickly and easily, including all schema objects and data from certain code tables that won’t change aka Static data. Then, once you have ported your database successfully to source control, to be able to update the repository nightly with any and all changed objects. In this way, you’ve fully and automatically source-controlled your database, without having to worry about direct integration, check ins, check outs etc. essentially providing much of the “gain” of database source control integration, with little of the “pain”. This article will describe how to build this “poor man’s” SQL database source control integration system using a 3rd party tool, ApexSQL Script

March 28, 2016

How to work with SQL database source control labels

A SQL database source control “label” or “tag” (aka revision tag) (name depends on the particular source control system) represents a snapshot in time of the source control repository and its contents. It can be saved as a reference for the future use. When the database development cycles reach a particular milestone e.g. a new build, a source control label can be created as a checkpoint. The team can continue to work on the database but revert to the source control label at any time.

October 27, 2015

How to implement SQL Server source control using the shared development model

Having a team of developers working on the same (shared) database can be challenging for many reasons. It is critical to ensure that all changes are properly tracked and that each developer is informed about the status of objects currently used by the rest of the team. When using a shared database, all changes will be applied against the database before they are committed to the repository.

October 9, 2015